Category Archives: population genetics

How to handle the burden of deleterious mutations

With the increasingly pressing matter of populations being threatened by fragmentation and isolation, and with progressively more efficient sequencing technologies and analytical tools at hand, conservation genetics is starting to turn the spotlight on the topic of genetic load. It … Continue reading

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The genomic & physiological basis of high altitude adaptation in North American deer mice

In biology, there are many ways to solve evolutionary ‘challenges’ so it always amazes me when organisms solve them in similar ways. And I love a good paper that adds to our attempts to dissect multi-trait adaptations. Recently, Schweizer et … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, evolution, genomics, mammals, population genetics, RNAseq, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Even in the ocean, geography shapes how species cope with changing climates

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Go north, young salamander

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Bigger bees bumble by barriers, end up with lower population genetic differentiation

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Population genetics takes the “co” out of snake-newt coevolution (maybe)

A textbook example of predator-prey coevolution could need revision, if the conclusions of a recently posted pre-print hold up more broadly. The manuscript, lead-authored by Michael Hague with Amber Stokes, Chris Feldman, and Ed and “Butch” Brodie, calls into question … Continue reading

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Kelp forests: the underwater woodlands

Aisha O’ Connor wrote this post as a project for Stacy Krueger-Hadfield’s Conservation Genetics course at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She sat in on lectures while she was at UAB as part of a British Phycological Society Student Bursary … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, ecology, evolution, fieldwork, haploid-diploid, natural history, population genetics, Science Communication | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Do we need to get to Mars first before we start understanding change in our oceans?

The current American administration is excited about its space program on extraterrestrial exploration and discovery. A mission to the moon, several ones to Mars, and perhaps others someday to other planets are part of the current funding plan. NASA has … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, evolution, journal club, population genetics, Science Communication, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

A Highlight of Molecular Ecology outside of Academia

I’ve recently made a career change. Actually, I’m not even sure whether to call it that, or the next step of a natural, if meandering progression of a scientist not on the academic career path. Even though I see more and … Continue reading

Posted in career, conservation, ecology, funding, pedigree, population genetics, quantitative genetics, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Conference catch-up: The many colors of snow

Red snow … watermelon snow … green snow … did you know that snow came in so many different colors? I had never heard of watermelon ice (#🍉❄) until a talk given by Robin Kodner from Western Washington University at … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, bioinformatics, citizen science, community ecology, evolution, fieldwork, mating system, microbiology, natural history, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics, selection, speciation, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment