Category Archives: Molecular Ecology, the journal

Nick Fountain-Jones wins Harry Smith Prize for study of virus transmission among urban bobcats

A camera-trapped bobcat near Anaheim, California, where Fountain-Jones et al (2017) examined Feline Immunodeficiency Virus transmission. (Observation from iNaturalist) The Harry Smith Prize is awarded for the best paper in Molecular Ecology in the previous year led by an early-career researcher. The … Continue reading

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Robin Waples receives 2018 Molecular Ecology Prize

Robin Waples receives the prize plate from prior Molecular Ecology Prize winner Fred Allendorf (photo credit: Diane Haddon) Robin Waples, the 2018 winner of the Molecular Ecology Prize, received a plate commemorating the award in a ceremony Sunday at the … Continue reading

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Robin Waples awarded the 2018 Molecular Ecology Prize

The 2018 Molecular Ecology prize has been awarded to Robin Waples for his work on conservation biology and management, particularly as the leading expert on approaches for using molecular markers to estimate and understand effective population size in natural populations, … Continue reading

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Nominations open for the Harry Smith Prize in Molecular Ecology

Posted on behalf of the Harry Smith Prize Selection Committee. The editorial board of the journal Molecular Ecology has established a new prize to recognize the best paper published in Molecular Ecology in the previous year by graduate students or … Continue reading

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Nominations Open for 2018 Molecular Ecology Prize

We are soliciting nominations for the annual Molecular Ecology Prize. The field of molecular ecology is young and inherently interdisciplinary. As a consequence, research in molecular ecology is not currently represented by a single scientific society, so there is no … Continue reading

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What’s in a name? A review of cryptic species and species concepts

It is a contentious can of worms. Species concepts are both essential to understand and at the same time incredibly difficult to define. Species names allow us to discuss fundamental units of biodiversity in any ecosystem and study genome evolution, … Continue reading

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Posted in evolution, Molecular Ecology, the journal, speciation, species delimitation | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Nancy Moran awarded the 2017 Molecular Ecology Prize

The 2017 Molecular Ecology Prize will go to Professor Nancy Moran of the University of Texas at Austin. The Prize is awarded by the Editorial Board of Molecular Ecology to recognize “an outstanding scientist who has made significant contributions to … Continue reading

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Molecular adaptation in a deep-sea alien…*ahem* amphipod

Space: the final frontier…or is it? I was inspired Jeremy’s post yesterday to talk about that deep dark abyss that takes up the vast majority of our mostly blue planet. For the record, I’m in agreement with the assessments for the … Continue reading

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Relatively rare tropical trees all agree: avoiding the ‘rain of death’ seems like a good call

When you think of a tropical jungle, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Probably a lush green landscape with trees, vines, flowers, and let’s be real, at least one toucan. Tropical forests are made up of diverse groups … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, plants, transcriptomics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

You can call her queen bee: the role of epigenetics in honeybee development

Insects have social lifestyles that are often organized in castes. Within the insect community, different individuals specialize, each having a unique role. This efficient method of doling out the workload, ultimately, is believed to be why social insect lifestyles are … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, haploid-diploid, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, RNAseq | Tagged , , | Leave a comment