Tag Archives: microbial communities

A bloom by any other name

Once a year during the spring, when conditions are juuuuust right, phytoplankton are terrible at social distancing. This annual bloom that takes place in the spring from 35º North in the North Atlantic and reaches all the way to the … Continue reading

Posted in community ecology, ecology, microbiology | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Of microbes and whales

At the end of January, the International Society for Microbial Ecology (ISME) journal put out a list: “Readers’ Choice: The best of The ISME Journal 2019” . I don’t know about you (my fellow scientists also with 35+ chrome tabs … Continue reading

Posted in bioinformatics, community ecology, ecology, mammals, microbiology | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Signal Boosting a Comprehensive Review of eDNA and Metabarcoding Studies

Everything is meta these days – metabarcoding, metagenomics, and now meta blog posts that are reviews of reviews. Much like every ecologist at least dabbles in the molecular world, so most of those predisposed to molecular ecology and population genetics … Continue reading

Posted in bioinformatics, community ecology, DNA barcoding, metagenomics, methods, microbiology, next generation sequencing, population genetics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Who’s really riding the subway with you? Characterization of the microbial communities on Boston transport

(Figure modified from Hsu et al., 2016, Boston transport map and wikicommons image of Boston) Understanding the microbes around us is an important challenge to take on. There have been articles covering changes in microbial communities among rural and more … Continue reading

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How urbanization might affect the five-second rule

At this point, we know that microbes are everywhere and make up complex communities found all over the place ranging from oceanic hydrothermal vents to lakes, soils, and, yes of course, all over you. It has also become apparent that … Continue reading

Posted in community ecology, microbiology | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments