Category Archives: career

Microbiomes of a small conference

The conference season is almost over. There are still a few gems out there worth attending before school starts. I just came back from the Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics Conference which took place at a UCLA resort in the mountains. … Continue reading

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Not my problem

Do American scientists know that doing research in America is a necessary step for many scientists from other parts of the world in order to get a permanent job in academia in their home country? Once in the US, these … Continue reading

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500 Queer Scientists

When I heard the first time about 500 Queer Scientists (@QueerSci, #QueerSTEM) I thought for myself ‘Why do we need to support STEM scientists based on their sexual orientation?’. This is how ignorant and clumsy I am. We got sensitized … Continue reading

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We can make academia more family friendly

This one tickled me for too long. It became a serious itch and I feel I have to say something. Two weeks ago, Rebecca Calisi Rodríguez and a Working Group of Mothers in Science published an opinion article in the … Continue reading

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#NewPI chat: Third (or maybe fourth) time’s the charm edition

Following up on last fall’s group-chat discussion of life as a new(is) professor, three Molecular Ecologist contributors who are in our first years on faculty recently reconvened on the TME Slack channel to talk about that #NewPI life for an … Continue reading

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How Molecular Ecologists Work: Sean Hoban on Google Docs and time-per-task calculations

Welcome to “How Molecular Ecologists Work”, the interview series that asks scientists how they get stuff done. In the final installment of this second season of interviews, we welcome Dr. Sean Hoban from The Morton Arboretum. Location: The Morton Arboretum, a botanical … Continue reading

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How Molecular Ecologists Work: Kathryn Hodgins on one liners and the beautiful drone of construction work

Welcome to “How Molecular Ecologists Work”, the interview series that asks scientists how they get stuff done. This week, we are headed to Australia to talk to Dr. Kathryn Hodgins. Her work focuses on understanding rapid local adaptation, especially in the … Continue reading

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How Molecular Ecologists Work: Daniel Cadena on the eclectic approach and getting the country view

Welcome to “How Molecular Ecologists Work”, the interview series that asks scientists how they get stuff done. This week, I’m interviewing Carlos Daniel Cadena, Professor at Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. Daniel’s work cuts across a broad swath of evolution … Continue reading

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How Molecular Ecologists Work: Chris Jiggins on organic collaboration and family gardening

Welcome to “How Molecular Ecologists Work”, the interview series that asks scientists how they get stuff done. This week’s interview is with Dr. Chris Jiggins from the University of Cambridge. Chris and his colleagues broadly study the adaptation and speciation of … Continue reading

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How Molecular Ecologists Work: Katy Heath on being an expert sleeper and not over-analyzing

Welcome to “How Molecular Ecologists Work”, the interview series that asks scientists how they get stuff done. This week’s interview is from Dr. Katy Heath from the Department of Plant Biology and the University of Illinois. Katy and her team study … Continue reading

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