Author Archives: Stacy Krueger-Hadfield

About Stacy Krueger-Hadfield

I am a marine evolutionary ecologist interested in the impacts of seascapes and complex life cycles on marine population dynamics. I use natural history, manipulative field experiments and population genetic and genomic approaches with algal and invertebrate models in temperate rocky shores,estuaries and the open ocean.

Coral clonal chimeras

We are all too aware of the threats ecosystem engineers, such as corals, face in light of global climate change. However, a new study by Rinkevich et al. (2016) suggest chimerism may be a a weapon to combat climate change. … Continue reading

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There and back again: an angiosperm’s tale

Eelgrass (Zostera marina) is the dominant seagrass in the northern hemisphere and provides the foundation of highly productive ecosystems that rival tropical rain forests and coral reefs in ecosystem services. Zostera isn’t really a grass, but a monocot, like a … Continue reading

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A race to the bottom with a new card from the coevolutionary deck

I’m a sucker for a clever, amusing title, though I’ve recently read that amusing titles are cited less (see here). Alas, maybe a well placed metaphor can enliven a manuscript and also not get lost in a citation-less abyss? In basic … Continue reading

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Macroalgal miscellany

It’s been a jam-packed week and I’ve found myself at Friday. Grandiose plans for a post continuing the series on clonality (see here and here) did not come to fruition. But, I was saved with a new article that tumbled … Continue reading

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An evolutionary cycle …

Rescan, Lenormand and Roze (2016) recently published new models on the evolution of life cycles in The American Naturalist. Most animals and protists have diploid life cycles in which the haploid stage is reduced to a single-celled gamete. Other organisms, such … Continue reading

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Lonesome George, no longer?

Galapagos tortoises summon up images of great, lumbering beasts on idyllic islands that planted the seeds of natural selection in the young naturalist, Charles Darwin. In a recent paper, Poulakakis et al. (2015) provide genetic evidence of two lineages of tortoises … Continue reading

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Gracilaria , currywurst and aebleskivers

Another travelogue for a Monday afternoon! Our first official European stop on the Gracilaria vermiculophylla tour was in Germany and Denmark hosted by a colleague without whom we wouldn’t have been able to embark on this adventure! I first met Florian Weinberger … Continue reading

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An Oedipus complex in mosses?

Nannandrous … phyllodioicous … gotta love botanical terms and these will most definitely find their way into this week’s list of favorite words! Both refer to the tiny epiphytic nature of males situated on much larger female shoots. There may be many … Continue reading

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Pre-adapted algal ancestors colonized land

The colonization of land by plants 450 Mya marked a major transition on Earth and was one of the critical events that led to the emergence of extant terrestrial ecosystems. Chief among the challenges the terrestrial environment presented for these … Continue reading

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Best laid plans of algae and academics oft go astray

When you’re stuck in R and feel some procrastination is in order … write another travelogue post! I’ve wanted to spin some yarns about field mishaps. There’s no way we could sample over 45 sites without something going wrong. For our Northeast … Continue reading

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