Author Archives: Stacy Krueger-Hadfield

About Stacy Krueger-Hadfield

I am a marine evolutionary ecologist interested in the impacts of seascapes and complex life cycles on marine population dynamics. I use natural history, manipulative field experiments and population genetic and genomic approaches with algal and invertebrate models in temperate rocky shores,estuaries and the open ocean.

The scent of home

We decided to divide and conquere the west coast of North America in search of more populations of Gracilaria vermiculophylla, as if we didn’t already have enough by Midsummer’s Eve! I headed to my home state – California. I was able to sneak … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, DNA barcoding, evolution, haploid-diploid, natural history, phylogenetics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bees brought to their knees

As regular readers of TME will have read, this past summer was a whirlwind of sampling in which I took the briefest of holidays in the Southwest of England before attending the European Phycological Congress (read about the congress here and here). … Continue reading

Posted in bioinformatics, Coevolution, evolution, genomics, next generation sequencing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What’s a Wachapreague?

Heading north to Virginia (and our base of operations at the VIMS Eastern Shore Lab, ESL) was one of the easiest, in terms of travel and packing. Though maybe not the coolest ride around, a minivan doesn’t have 50 lb … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, DNA barcoding, haploid-diploid, population genetics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Keeping up with the kelps

After we returned from Japan, we embarked on sampling both coasts of North America (but more on that soon!) and Europe. July, August and September blurred together, punctuated by lugging heavy bags weighed down with silica gel and bad airline food. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

A Nice opinion on confronting uncertainty and modeling it for GBS data

Just over a week ago, I had the opportunity to work in Chris Nice‘s lab at Texas State University. I was accompanied by one of our MS students, Ben, and my colleague, Erik Sotka, to prep libraries for a genomic … Continue reading

Posted in bioinformatics, genomics, interview | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

To the final estuaries

For the final stop on our Japanese sampling leg, we ventured to the most populous metropolitan area in the world. Tokyo was known as Edo (江戸), or estuary, until it became the imperial capital in 1868. An apt location to end our field expedition … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, domestication, evolution, haploid-diploid | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Three Views of Japan

By the time we reached Sendai, we were heading into our fourth week of sharing one tiny suitcase of clothes, while bags of silica were luxuriously spread across three large suitcases! Games of Jenga in the teeny rental cars were … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, community, evolution, haploid-diploid, natural history | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Along the Mackerel Road

We left Hokkaido and flew to Osaka where we collected our next rental car (our first teeny tiny one!) As our flight was delayed due to weather in Hokkaido, we decided to break the journey between Osaka and Obama (it … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, blogging, community, haploid-diploid, natural history, population genetics, speciation | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

An unspoiled frontier

“An unspoiled frontier, an escape from industrialized Japan and a chance to connect with nature …” or so says the Rough Guide to Japan (6th edition, September 2014). We had experienced a bit of the city-scene in Hakodate, but the rest … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, conservation, evolution, natural history, population genetics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

In the northern biosphere

As regular readers will know, I’ve spent the summer traveling around the Northern Hemisphere sampling the red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla, an introduced alga in North America and Europe. I’ve rewound to the beginning of the summer in order to highlight our … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, blogging, community, haploid-diploid, natural history | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment