Category Archives: RNAseq

The world through the senses of a pangolin

This Saturday, February 15, is World Pangolin Day, and thus it is a good time to do some PR for these fascinating animals.

Continue reading
Posted in ecology, evolution, genomics, mammals, RNAseq, transcriptomics | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes and Not a Single to Spare

What is the weight of a transcriptome? How about a thousand? Every day new sequencing machines are purring away, base pair by base pair, producing novel insights into the genomes of our favorite organisms. As technology improves, costs come down, and opportunities … Continue reading

Posted in phylogenetics, plants, RNAseq, transcriptomics | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The genomic & physiological basis of high altitude adaptation in North American deer mice

In biology, there are many ways to solve evolutionary ‘challenges’ so it always amazes me when organisms solve them in similar ways. And I love a good paper that adds to our attempts to dissect multi-trait adaptations. Recently, Schweizer et … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, evolution, genomics, mammals, population genetics, RNAseq, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Beetles’ diversity was driven by coevolution with plants — and a little help from some microbial friends

Posted in insects, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, plants, RNAseq | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

They joy of genome sequencing: when genomics meets natural history

When I have a massive pile of papers that I need to read, I can’t help but look at the ones with interesting natural history first. There’s something exceptionally satisfying about using modern tools to dig deeper into the features … Continue reading

Posted in evolution, genomics, RNAseq, transcriptomics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

RNA data ruins a tempting just-so story of mutualism between algae and salamanders

Most relationships between animals and microbes interface in one of two locations: on the outside of animal cells (mostly to the benefit of both parties, think gut microbiota) or on the inside of animal cells (mostly to the benefit of … Continue reading

Posted in RNAseq | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The largest mammalian genome is not polyploid

Some 40 million years ago in South America, following the arrival of the common ancestor of caviomorph rodents from the Old World, big changes were afoot. Specifically, the caviomorph colonists were beginning to give rise to an extant evolutionary progeny … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, bioinformatics, genomics, RNAseq, transcriptomics | Leave a comment

On hyRAD-X, another option for museum genomics

Last year, I profiled Suchan et al.’s “hyRAD” method for reduced-representation genome sequencing of degraded sources of DNA using RAD probes. While it’s too early to say whether hyRAD will be widely used by molecular ecologists looking to integrate historic … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, methods, natural history, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics, RNAseq, selection, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

You can call her queen bee: the role of epigenetics in honeybee development

Insects have social lifestyles that are often organized in castes. Within the insect community, different individuals specialize, each having a unique role. This efficient method of doling out the workload, ultimately, is believed to be why social insect lifestyles are … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, haploid-diploid, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, RNAseq | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Right reads, wrong index? Concerns with data from Illumina’s HiSeq 4000

Commanding around a 70% share of a 1.3 billion USD market, Illumina is the major player in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. More likely than not, if you’re a molecular ecologist working with NGS data, you’ve run your samples on a … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, next generation sequencing, RNAseq, technical, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments