What we’re reading: Genomic selection scans, local adaptation, and the grass is actually pretty green on this side of the publishing fence

Book

In the journals

Cadzow M, J Boocock, HT Nguyen, P Wilcox, TR Merriman and MA Black. 2014. A bioinformatics workflow for detecting signatures of selection in genomic data. Front. Genet. 5:293. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2014.00293.

Here we describe a basic workflow, constructed from open source tools, for detecting and examining evidence of selection in genomic data.

Leamy LJ, C-R Lee, V Cousins, I Mujacic, AJ Manzaneda, K Prasad, T Mitchell-Olds and B-H Song 2014. Large-scale adaptive divergence in Boechera fecunda, an endangered wild relative of Arabidopsis. Ecology and Evolution 2014 4:3175–3186. doi: 10.1002/ece3.1148.

… we assessed the genetic divergence of five quantitative traits in 10 populations of an endangered cruciferous species, Boechera fecunda, found in only several populations in each of two geographic regions (WEST and EAST) in southwestern Montana.

In the news

“More than 50 co-authors from four countries helped collect and analyze the viral sequences. Five of them contracted Ebola virus disease themselves and died.”

“We scientists may whinge about our journals, but they seem to be doing a better job across the board than in other academic fields.”

“The best way to learn how [science communication works] behind the scenes is to get behind the scenes, and to work for funding agencies or for publishers or to try working with the media. But when I do these things, some people make me feel that because I no longer work in a lab, I am now vastly inferior to people who still actively do research.”

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About Jeremy Yoder

Jeremy Yoder is an Assistant Professor of Biology at California State University, Northridge. He also blogs at Denim and Tweed, and tweets under the handle @jbyoder.
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