Category Archives: speciation

Growing the evolutionary relationship between green algae and salamanders

The presence of  green algae within the developing egg masses of amphibians has been recognized since the early 1900s, but only recently have researchers discovered that the these algae (termed “Oophila”) persist in animal tissues far after leaving the egg. The … Continue reading

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Posted in Coevolution, phylogenetics, speciation | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The forest resounding at rare intervals with the note of … reproductive isolation

Hybrid zones are often used as a window with which to gaze upon the evolutionary process (Barton and Hewitt 1989). With the advent of genomic tools, it is possible to detect the genomic signatures and the architecture underlying reproductive isolation. In … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, conservation, genomics, next generation sequencing, population genetics, speciation | 1 Comment

The Tortoise Time Warp

Recent advances in genetic data analysis continue to provide the ability to reveal some amazingly detailed (and previously unattainable) information about species’ evolutionary history. In this recent study from Molecular Ecology, Dr. Ryan Garrick and colleagues use a variety of … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology, the journal, phylogenetics, speciation | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

How many genes does it take to make a new species?

Three-spined sticklebacks are speciation machines. When retreating glaciers exposed lakes and rivers around the coasts of northern North America and Eurasia, these armor-plated little fish colonized the new freshwater habitats from the ocean, and adapted to the threats and resources … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Evolution 2013 Recap

As we all slowly trickle back from the recent SSE meeting in Snowbird, we’ll each be posting our own thoughts and summaries of the conference. I personally had a fantastic time, met a lot of great people, and saw a … Continue reading

Posted in conferences, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation, theory, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Relentless Evolution: The vital relevance of the visible

One of Stephen Jay Gould’s sharpest conceptual coinages was a barb leveled, from his paleontological perspective, at the body of research focused on bouts of adaptive evolution occurring over “ecological” timespans on the order of a few generations. Reviewing such … Continue reading

Posted in book review, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Speciation with gene flow and the virtual beanbag: Genome-level effects increase divergence during ecological speciation, but linkage is not required

This post is a guest contribution by Dylan Goldade, Kathryn Theiss, and Chris Smith, from the Biology Department at Willamette University. See below for the coauthors’ afflilations and research interests. In a famous address given on the hundredth anniversary of the … Continue reading

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One of these flycatchers is not like the other …

When you think about it, an awful lot of the things you can do with a genome sequence amount to lining it up next to another genome sequence, and then listing all the places where they differ. That’s more or … Continue reading

Posted in next generation sequencing, speciation | Leave a comment