Category Archives: speciation

How many genes does it take to make a new species?

Three-spined sticklebacks are speciation machines. When retreating glaciers exposed lakes and rivers around the coasts of northern North America and Eurasia, these armor-plated little fish colonized the new freshwater habitats from the ocean, and adapted to the threats and resources … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Evolution 2013 Recap

As we all slowly trickle back from the recent SSE meeting in Snowbird, we’ll each be posting our own thoughts and summaries of the conference. I personally had a fantastic time, met a lot of great people, and saw a … Continue reading

Posted in conferences, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation, theory, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Relentless Evolution: The vital relevance of the visible

One of Stephen Jay Gould’s sharpest conceptual coinages was a barb leveled, from his paleontological perspective, at the body of research focused on bouts of adaptive evolution occurring over “ecological” timespans on the order of a few generations. Reviewing such … Continue reading

Posted in book review, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Speciation with gene flow and the virtual beanbag: Genome-level effects increase divergence during ecological speciation, but linkage is not required

This post is a guest contribution by┬áDylan Goldade, Kathryn Theiss, and Chris Smith, from the Biology Department at Willamette University. See below for the coauthors’ afflilations and research interests. In a famous address given on the hundredth anniversary of the … Continue reading

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One of these flycatchers is not like the other …

When you think about it, an awful lot of the things you can do with a genome sequence amount to lining it up next to another genome sequence, and then listing all the places where they differ. That’s more or … Continue reading

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