Category Archives: quantitative genetics

The slow, and sometimes incomplete, journey to diploidy

Whether you are reading this as a plant, an animal, or fungus, it is likely that some ancestor of yours doubled up on genomes. However, it is likely that these extra genomes disappeared over evolutionary time. What gives? Where are those extra … Continue reading

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Posted in evolution, genomics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Are genetic drift and inbreeding the same thing?

Does it ever happen to you that the more you try to understand something, the more difficult to understand it turns out to be? Recently, I’ve had such a problem with two of the very basic microevolutionary phenomena – genetic … Continue reading

Posted in conservation, evolution, population genetics, quantitative genetics, theory, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

A different perspective on genetic architecture

As an ecological geneticist, I’m constantly reminded how much we don’t understand about the genetic nature of adaptive variation. Sure, we have lots of examples of genes/pathways/regions that seem to be responsible for adaptation, but we don’t really know if … Continue reading

Posted in association genetics, evolution, genomics, mutation, quantitative genetics, theory | Leave a comment

A molecular how-to for hibernating this winter

As the academic semester ends, I see the tell-tale signs of the upcoming holiday hibernation. The weary eyes of teaching assistants peeking over piles of final exams. Students who may have mentally been on break before finals even started. A little … Continue reading

Posted in association genetics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, quantitative genetics, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

From cats to rats: two studies on domestication and tameness

Anyone who has ever read Charles Darwin is acutely aware of his fascination with domestication – particularly how he fancied fancy pigeons. Darwin drew on his domestication obsession while writing his book, The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, domestication, genomics, methods, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, quantitative genetics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

How many genes does it take to make a new species?

Three-spined sticklebacks are speciation machines. When retreating glaciers exposed lakes and rivers around the coasts of northern North America and Eurasia, these armor-plated little fish colonized the new freshwater habitats from the ocean, and adapted to the threats and resources … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , | 5 Comments

People behind the Science: Dr. Montgomery Slatkin

To honor his recent election to the National Academy of Sciences, we’re featuring Dr. Montgomery Slatkin of the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Slatkin is known for his work in theoretical population genetics, in particular with regard to gene flow … Continue reading

Posted in interview, population genetics, quantitative genetics | Tagged | Leave a comment