Category Archives: population genetics

Signal Boosting a Comprehensive Review of eDNA and Metabarcoding Studies

Everything is meta these days – metabarcoding, metagenomics, and now meta blog posts that are reviews of reviews. Much like every ecologist at least dabbles in the molecular world, so most of those predisposed to molecular ecology and population genetics … Continue reading

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Posted in bioinformatics, community ecology, DNA barcoding, metagenomics, methods, microbiology, next generation sequencing, population genetics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The secret life of invaders

So I have this pet theory. And damn if the evidence doesn’t seem to be piling up. Am I living in the bubble of my own google alerts? Possibly. I’m an evolutionary ecologist and invasion biologist, and (surprise!) my pet … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, evolution, hybridization, mating system, population genetics | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Are population genomic scans for locally adapted loci too successful?

Last Friday, Molecular Ecology released an interesting new systematic review online ahead of print. Colin Ahrens and coauthors at a number of Australian research institutions compiled results from 66 papers reporting tests for locally adapted loci based on either FST … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, association genetics, evolution, genomics, population genetics, selection | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Molecular ecology, the flowchart

Towards the end of last semester my department’s evolutionary genetics journal club read Rasmus Nielsen’s terrific 2005 review of tests for recent natural selection in genetic data. Nielsen provides figures illustrating the effects of a recent selective sweep and the … Continue reading

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Posted in association genetics, bioinformatics, genomics, howto, infographic, linkage mapping, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics, selection | Leave a comment

In the aftermath of fire, bluebird species boundaries may blur

One of the most clear-cut reasons that species evolve to fill different ecological niches is competition. Two otherwise similar species that use the same resources experience strong selection favoring the use of less-similar resources, if they have the option. The … Continue reading

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Posted in birds, evolution, hybridization, natural history, population genetics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

When less might be more: The evolution of reduced genomes

The advent of affordable genome sequencing has provided us with a wealth of data. Researchers have sequenced everything from Escherichia coli (4.6 Mbp genome size), to sea urchins (810 Mbp), chimpanzees (3.3 Gbp), and humans (3.2 Gbp). Then there are the … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, Coevolution, evolution, genomics, microbiology, population genetics, selection | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

On hyRAD-X, another option for museum genomics

Last year, I profiled Suchan et al.’s “hyRAD” method for reduced-representation genome sequencing of degraded sources of DNA using RAD probes. While it’s too early to say whether hyRAD will be widely used by molecular ecologists looking to integrate historic … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, methods, natural history, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics, RNAseq, selection, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Shared patterns of genomic diversity across populations of distantly related taxa

Genomic diversity is shaped by the complex interplay between the effects of genetic drift and natural selection among populations. Several of these effects, especially those of linked selection at neutral sites, adaptive introgression, and barriers to migration (often called “genomic … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, bioinformatics, birds, evolution, genomics, population genetics, selection | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Hype Cycle of Ancient DNA

Recently I saw a graph that I’ve learnt is called the Hype Cycle and is a methodology used in assessment of new technologies and their marketing. What strikes me about it is how well it fits my own research field, … Continue reading

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Posted in evolution, natural history, Paleogenomics, phylogenetics, population genetics, theory | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Like Turtles, Terrapin Research Moves a Little Slow

Marlee Hayes wrote this post as a final project for Stacy Krueger-Hadfield’s Science Communication course at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her primary interests focus on challenges in conservation and sustainability. Previously, she evaluated fitness of post-hatchling Diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin), … Continue reading

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Posted in blogging, community ecology, conservation, evolution, natural history, population genetics | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment