Category Archives: pedigree

haploidy, diploidy, polyploidy … not a problem

Investigating pairwise relatedness is fundamental to the characterization of the mating system and inferring genetic structure. If no pedigree exists, then relatedness is estimated from genetic markers (e.g., microsatellite loci) using method-of-moment or maximum-likelihood methods. However, not all individuals in … Continue reading

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Posted in natural history, pedigree, population genetics, software, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The genetics of another multi-level society

Long-time readers (i.e., “for more than one week”) of The Molecular Ecologist will notice that this is the 2nd post on the socio-genetics of a primate multi-level society. The first being Melissa’s post last week that covered my recent paper … Continue reading

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The latest gadget for the molecular ecologist’s toolkit

Designing a sampling scheme to collect an organism of interest for a population genetic/genomic study can be fraught with difficulty. How best to sample? Randomly? Or, along a grid? How many individuals to sample? Thirty? Or, perhaps, the sample size … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, methods, Molecular Ecology, the journal, natural history, pedigree, population genetics, software | 1 Comment

Q&A: Stacey Dunn chases pronghorn fawns up Bateman’s slope

Stacey Dunn is, objectively, pretty amazing. She started grad school at the Univeristy of Idaho a year before I did, studying sexual selection in pronghorn antelope on the National Bison Range in Montana. In between catching baby pronghorn (so as … Continue reading

Posted in interview, pedigree | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment