Category Archives: next generation sequencing

On hyRAD-X, another option for museum genomics

Last year, I profiled Suchan et al.’s “hyRAD” method for reduced-representation genome sequencing of degraded sources of DNA using RAD probes. While it’s too early to say whether hyRAD will be widely used by molecular ecologists looking to integrate historic … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, methods, natural history, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics, RNAseq, selection, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Molecular adaptation in a deep-sea alien…*ahem* amphipod

Space: the final frontier…or is it? I was inspired Jeremy’s post yesterday to talk about that deep dark abyss that takes up the vast majority of our mostly blue planet. For the record, I’m in agreement with the assessments for the … Continue reading

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Relatively rare tropical trees all agree: avoiding the ‘rain of death’ seems like a good call

When you think of a tropical jungle, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Probably a lush green landscape with trees, vines, flowers, and let’s be real, at least one toucan. Tropical forests are made up of diverse groups … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, plants, transcriptomics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

To RADseq or not to RADseq?

It’s a cliche to say that we live in a moment of unprecedented possibility for molecular ecology, as high-throughput sequencing methods drive the cost of collecting DNA sequence data ever lower. But at the same time, it’s a tricky moment, … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, association genetics, genomics, methods, next generation sequencing, selection | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

You can call her queen bee: the role of epigenetics in honeybee development

Insects have social lifestyles that are often organized in castes. Within the insect community, different individuals specialize, each having a unique role. This efficient method of doling out the workload, ultimately, is believed to be why social insect lifestyles are … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, haploid-diploid, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, RNAseq | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Right reads, wrong index? Concerns with data from Illumina’s HiSeq 4000

Commanding around a 70% share of a 1.3 billion USD market, Illumina is the major player in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. More likely than not, if you’re a molecular ecologist working with NGS data, you’ve run your samples on a … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, next generation sequencing, RNAseq, technical, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Small Molecules, Big Differences

Mary Latimer wrote this post as a final project for Stacy Krueger-Hadfield’s Science Communication course at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is a third year PhD student at UAB studying miRNAs and methionine restriction. Her hobbies include cats, netflix, … Continue reading

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Posted in bioinformatics, blogging, evolution, genomics, natural history, next generation sequencing, RNAseq | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment