Category Archives: next generation sequencing

We have the technology. Is sequencing getting better, smaller, faster?

Okay, I know some version of the phrase “recent developments in rapid and affordable sequencing have made blah blah blah possible…” is something you’ve probably read 10,000 times. However, third-generation sequencing platforms have turned out to be pretty darn astounding. … Continue reading

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Posted in bioinformatics, evolution, fieldwork, genomics, methods, next generation sequencing | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Non-model organisms are so hot right now

What makes a model organism? Well, as the name suggests, they are widely studied and have been adapted to a vast array of common genetic techniques. A few of the most often utilized organisms, which you are most likely already … Continue reading

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Posted in bioinformatics, domestication, evolution, genomics, next generation sequencing, yeast | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Genomes are coming: Sequence libraries from the honey bee reflect associated microbial diversity

One of the coolest of reasons that cheap sequencing is nifty, in my opinion, is that it has allowed researchers to study individual eukaryotic organisms, and their associated microbes (their microbiome). Let’s be real, we are in the midst of … Continue reading

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Posted in Coevolution, community ecology, evolution, genomics, metagenomics, microbiology, next generation sequencing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Easily aggregate bioinformatic sample output with one tool

Today I’m going to write about one of my favorite bioinformatic tools, MultiQC. If you’ve used it, you know why, and if you haven’t, prepare to be amazed. Many bioinformatic software produce output on a per-sample basis. That is, you … Continue reading

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On hyRAD-X, another option for museum genomics

Last year, I profiled Suchan et al.’s “hyRAD” method for reduced-representation genome sequencing of degraded sources of DNA using RAD probes. While it’s too early to say whether hyRAD will be widely used by molecular ecologists looking to integrate historic … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, methods, natural history, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics, RNAseq, selection, transcriptomics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Molecular adaptation in a deep-sea alien…*ahem* amphipod

Space: the final frontier…or is it? I was inspired Jeremy’s post yesterday to talk about that deep dark abyss that takes up the vast majority of our mostly blue planet. For the record, I’m in agreement with the assessments for the … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, evolution, genomics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Relatively rare tropical trees all agree: avoiding the ‘rain of death’ seems like a good call

When you think of a tropical jungle, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Probably a lush green landscape with trees, vines, flowers, and let’s be real, at least one toucan. Tropical forests are made up of diverse groups … Continue reading

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Posted in genomics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, plants, transcriptomics | Tagged , | Leave a comment