Category Archives: Molecular Ecology views

A few good molecular ecologists: six months and 116 posts later

My usual Wednesday spot on The Molecular Ecologist is primetime real estate: a lot of journal table-of-contents get sent out on Tuesday/Wednesday and whole slew of people are in the office looking at computer screens. This usually produces a nice readership on Wednesdays, … Continue reading

RedditDiggMendeleyPocketShare and Enjoy
Posted in blogging, Molecular Ecology views, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Mike Sovic on what comes AftrRAD

We’ve recently been highlighting some discussions comparing different protocols for restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). We’ve seen the pros and cons of multiple techniques, but what happens when you finally have thousands of shiny SNPs sitting on your hard drive? Multiple … Continue reading

Posted in interview, Molecular Ecology views, next generation sequencing | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Totally RAD, Part 2

Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) is quickly becoming the go-to methodology for collecting population genetic data, and the methodological difficulties of a technique that is exploding in popularity are coming along with it. Last month, Stacy pointed you towards a … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, Molecular Ecology views, next generation sequencing, population genetics | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

The big chief at Molecular Ecology Resources: Interviewing Shawn Narum

What are the most exciting parts of doing science? The first look at results? The sheen of your publication finally in print? That initial foray out into the field? What about the moment you figure out a way to make a … Continue reading

Posted in interview, methods, Molecular Ecology views, science publishing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Molecular ecology views: Metapopulation dynamics from lab flasks to tidal pools

Our co-blogger Peter Fields is joining the lab of Dieter Ebert at the University of Basel this fall, and he sent along these photos of the Ebert group’s long-term work on the metapopulation dynamics of parasite infection in Daphina water … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Molecular Ecology views, population genetics | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What we’re reading: Well, actually, we were all at this conference …

As you may have noticed. But I did take a lot of nice photos, anyway. More thoughts on Evolution 2013 forthcoming. It was a great meeting!

Posted in community, conferences, Molecular Ecology views | Tagged | Leave a comment

Molecular ecology views: It’s a bird, it’s a plane … it’s a UAV

From the Laboratory of Geographic Information Systems (LASIG) – Landscape Genetics Group – at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Stephane Joost sends along his view of molecular ecology—from high altitude. Joost’s group applies geographic information systems (GIS) in … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology views | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Molecular ecology views: Track a pika by its hair

Via the MolecularEcologistView tag on Flickr, Philippe Henry sends images of his doctoral dissertation work on American pika (Ochotona princeps) in the central Coast Mountains of British Colubmia. To understand the pikas’ population genetic structure, he captured DNA samples using … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology views | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Molecular ecology views: Shenandoah butternuts

Sean Hoban, a postdoc at the Università di Ferrara, Italy, sends along these photos from his Ph.D. fieldwork on endangered butternut trees in beautiful Shenandoah National Park, USA. Many more pictures of Sean’s field work in forests across the eastern … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology views | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Molecular Ecology views: This [spruce] bud’s for you

Jill Hamilton sends in her view of molecular ecology in action: After a long day of clipping spruce buds from trees for DNA extraction there was a need to process the samples a bit further as we reached our sample … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology views | 1 Comment