Category Archives: Molecular Ecology, the journal

Adapting to the new wave of isolation by environment

Isolation by environment, not distance, explains the genetic relationship between an avian taxon among Madrean Sky Islands, according to a new study appearing in Molecular Ecology by Manthey and Moyle. The authors throw the kitchen sink of new analyses at a combination … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, Molecular Ecology, the journal, phylogeography | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

The evolution of phylogeography in the next gen era: 20 years in review

Phylogeographers have long known about the limitations of single locus studies (ie, the effects of selective sweeps, stochasticity in lineage sorting among loci) and that adding loci improves the accuracy of demographic parameter estimates. As we continue to shift towards collecting multi-locus datasets thanks to high throughput … Continue reading

Posted in evolution, genomics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, phylogeography, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Landscape genetics gets existential

I had a lot of ideas for future posts, but “landscape genetics” keeps pulling me back. Beyond the new methodology, reviews, and empirical findings, I suppose someone has to pump the brakes and get more existential. Rodney Dyer does just … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology views, Molecular Ecology, the journal, population genetics | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Conversation starter: common mistakes in population genetics

When interpreting the results, it is important to focus more on biological relevance than on statistical significance. That does not mean that significance is unimportant; results that have a straightforward interpretation but are not significant should not be considered. On the … Continue reading

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Differential gene expression turns on salamander attack mode

The transcriptomics field is boomin’. Approaches like RNA-seq have opened the flood gates to hundreds and hundreds of investigations that compare gene expression between biologically-interesting phenotypes, variants, species, etc. Plastic phenotypes have been a fascinating area of study for decades … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology, the journal, transcriptomics | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Migration on the brain

If you’ve watched any number of nature shows in your lifetime, you’ve seen the astounding migrations made by salmonid fishes. You can count on seeing a shot of salmon darting against the current and catapulting themselves over turbulent falls (like … Continue reading

Posted in Molecular Ecology, the journal, natural history, RNAseq, transcriptomics | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Molecular Ecology’s best reviewers 2015

(Flickr: Kathrin & Stefan Marks) As a continuation of our post from last year, Molecular Ecology is publishing a list of our very best referees from the last two years (2013 and 2014). Our hope is that the people listed … Continue reading

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A transcriptomic approach for reduced representation in population genomics

                    Many population genomics studies use methods that provide a reduced representation of the genome, for example RADseq or UCEs. Targeting a subset of the genome reduces the cost of sequencing … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, howto, methods, Molecular Ecology, the journal, next generation sequencing, RNAseq | Leave a comment

Mating systems

In a new paper, published online in Molecular Ecology, Pannell (2015) reviews the literature on the evolution of mating systems and dispersal in colonizing species as component of a special issue called Invasion Genetics: The Baker and Stebbins Legacy.  This issue is … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Coevolution, conferences, evolution, Molecular Ecology, the journal, selection | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder

Many animals use visual signals to scope out potential mates. In a new paper in Molecular Ecology, Sandkam et al. (2015) demonstrate that the variation underlying preference in female guppies could be explained by simple changes in expression and coding of … Continue reading

Posted in Coevolution, evolution, Molecular Ecology, the journal, natural history, population genetics, speciation, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment