Category Archives: methods

The big chief at Molecular Ecology Resources: Interviewing Shawn Narum

What are the most exciting parts of doing science? The first look at results? The sheen of your publication finally in print? That initial foray out into the field? What about the moment you figure out a way to make a … Continue reading

RedditDiggMendeleyPocketShare and Enjoy
Posted in interview, methods, Molecular Ecology views, science publishing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The latest gadget for the molecular ecologist’s toolkit

Designing a sampling scheme to collect an organism of interest for a population genetic/genomic study can be fraught with difficulty. How best to sample? Randomly? Or, along a grid? How many individuals to sample? Thirty? Or, perhaps, the sample size … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, methods, Molecular Ecology, the journal, natural history, pedigree, population genetics, software | 1 Comment

From cats to rats: two studies on domestication and tameness

Anyone who has ever read Charles Darwin is acutely aware of his fascination with domestication – particularly how he fancied fancy pigeons. Darwin drew on his domestication obsession while writing his book, The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, domestication, genomics, methods, next generation sequencing, phylogenetics, quantitative genetics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bayesian Markov-chain Monte Carlo in population genetics

This is a guest post by Arun Sethuraman, a postdoctoral associate with Jody Hey, studying statistical models for divergence population genetics in the Department of Biology at Temple University. You can also find him on Twitter, and on his short story blog. Prompted by the great response … Continue reading

Posted in methods, population genetics, software | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Crowd-sourcing natural history

What I think of as my first “real” science job was a year I spent in Pittsburgh, interning for the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. One of my most enjoyable duties was assisting a WPC ecologist on systematic surveys of plant diversity … Continue reading

Posted in citizen science, community, methods | 8 Comments

2014 NGS Field Guide: Resistance is Futile (mostly, at least for a while)

This year, to introduce the 2014 update to his Next Generation Sequencing Field Guide—perennially our most-accessed community resource—Travis Glenn has a bit more to say than just what goes in the tables. So here it is as a guest post! … Continue reading

Posted in howto, methods, next generation sequencing | Leave a comment

On “triangulation” in genome scans

Guest contributor K.E. Lotterhos is a marine biologist at Wake Forest University, who studies evolutionary responses to fishing and climate change. You can find her on Twitter under then handle @dr_k_lo. A major goal of evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, genomics, methods, population genetics, quantitative genetics | 3 Comments

Why genetic tests are different

In yesterday’s New York Times, Kira Peikoff reported what happened when she took genetic tests for disease risks from three different providers—she got three very different results. 23andMe said my most elevated risks — about double the average — were … Continue reading

Posted in association genetics, medicine, methods | 2 Comments

Random drift and phenotypic evolution

This week we have a guest post from Markku Karhunen. Markku’s research at the University of Helsinki included the development and implementation of a number of very interesting and useful population genetics methods. In his guest post Markku discusses these … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, methods, population genetics, quantitative genetics, R, software, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Getting started with Ultra Conserved Elements

Cross posted on ngcrawford.com If you attended Evolution 2013, you probably heard quite a lot of chatter about ultra conserved elements. Essentially, ultra conserved elements (UCEs) are parts of the genome that are highly conserved between different species. Although UCEs … Continue reading

Posted in genomics, methods, phylogenetics | Leave a comment