Category Archives: DNA barcoding

Phylogeny of the elves illustrates why we need to sample elf DNA immediately

Last year for Christmas Eve, Dominic Evangelista reconstructed the evolutionary history of elves and elf-like fantasy creatures in a tour-de-force of nerd crossover. Seriously, go read that piece if you haven’t. It has an alternate abstract in Elvish. As with … Continue reading

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Posted in DNA barcoding, phylogenetics, primates, species delimitation | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

What do dolphins, bivalves and algae have in common?

Collaboration as it turns out, between three scientists interested in vertebrates, invertebrates and algae! A few days before we left for Evolution 2016 in Austin, one of my collaborators, Eric Pante, came to Charleston as the final stop in a North American … Continue reading

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Posted in bioinformatics, blogging, career, conferences, DNA barcoding, haploid-diploid, natural history, phylogenetics, phylogeography, population genetics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Macroalgal miscellany

It’s been a jam-packed week and I’ve found myself at Friday. Grandiose plans for a post continuing the series on clonality (see here and here) did not come to fruition. But, I was saved with a new article that tumbled … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, DNA barcoding, evolution, genomics, haploid-diploid, speciation | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Lonesome George, no longer?

Galapagos tortoises summon up images of great, lumbering beasts on idyllic islands that planted the seeds of natural selection in the young naturalist, Charles Darwin. In a recent paper, Poulakakis et al. (2015) provide genetic evidence of two lineages of tortoises … Continue reading

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Posted in conservation, DNA barcoding, natural history, pedigree, population genetics | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The scent of home

We decided to divide and conquere the west coast of North America in search of more populations of Gracilaria vermiculophylla, as if we didn’t already have enough by Midsummer’s Eve! I headed to my home state – California. I was able to sneak … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, DNA barcoding, evolution, haploid-diploid, natural history, phylogenetics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What’s a Wachapreague?

Heading north to Virginia (and our base of operations at the VIMS Eastern Shore Lab, ESL) was one of the easiest, in terms of travel and packing. Though maybe not the coolest ride around, a minivan doesn’t have 50 lb … Continue reading

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Polyploidy can melt the frozen niche

The rabbit hole of asexual reproduction literature is full of weird detours in the evolution of life. There are asexual lineages that facultatively have sex, asexuals that still need sperm from other species,  and asexuals that steal sperm from other species, … Continue reading

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Posted in DNA barcoding, natural history, plants | Tagged , , | Leave a comment