Category Archives: career

Live from London: reporting from “Elements, genomes, and ecosystems”

Scientific meetings are great: see old friends, meet new colleagues, sow the seeds of collaboration, see interesting work from around the world, and so on. They’re fun, they really are. But they can be so big. The annual meetings of the … Continue reading

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To review or not to review, that is the question

Imagine this scenario. You are industriously working away on your most recent paper (ignoring other pressing data analyses, administrative duties, and grant proposals). You have just begun to get into the zone of intense focus, writing nirvana, when DING!!! a … Continue reading

Posted in career, peer review, science publishing | 3 Comments

The results are in for the journal selection survey

Two weeks ago I wrote a post about a recent paper by Salinas and Munch that presented a model-based method for determining to which journal an author should submit a manuscript for publication. I was curious to know how the readers … Continue reading

Posted in career, Impact Factors, methods, peer review, science publishing | 2 Comments

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?*

[We want to know what you think! Please click on the link at the bottom of the post to complete a short survey and/or share your thoughts about the publishing process in the comments section below] For better or worse, … Continue reading

Posted in career, funding, Impact Factors, peer review, science publishing | 1 Comment

Increase your broader impacts with Data Nuggets

  This week we have a special guest post by Elizabeth Schultheis, a PhD candidate at Michigan State University and the Kellogg Biological Station, to describe her Data Nuggets project. Previous guest posts have discussed other great projects happening in the … Continue reading

Posted in career, citizen science, community, funding, methods | 1 Comment

Why we sign our peer reviews

Last week I posted the results from a brief survey of our readers, asking whether they usually sign their peer reviews. In that small sample of evolutionary ecologists, the overwhelming majority said they review anonymously, though many participants seem to … Continue reading

Posted in career, community, peer review, science publishing | 5 Comments

Why we don’t sign our peer reviews

Last week I posted the results from a brief survey of our readers, asking whether they usually sign their peer reviews. In that small sample of evolutionary ecologists, the overwhelming majority said they review anonymously, though many participants seem to … Continue reading

Posted in career, community, peer review, science publishing | 1 Comment

People behind the Science: Dr. Richard Lenski

A winter break special interview with Dr. Richard Lenski from Michigan State University! Dr. Lenski is probably best known for his amazingly long-long-term experimental evolution with E. coli that has been running for over 25 years and 58,000 bacterial generations! He’s … Continue reading

Posted in career, interview | Tagged | 4 Comments

The postdoc to faculty transition II: from job offer to start date

K.E. Lotterhos is a marine biologist studying evolutionary responses to fishing and climate change. She’s beginning a faculty position at Wake Forest University in January, and agreed to contribute two guest posts about the transition from a postdoc to running … Continue reading

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The postdoc to faculty transition I: from application to interview

K.E. Lotterhos is a marine biologist studying evolutionary responses to fishing and climate change. She’s beginning a faculty position at Wake Forest University in January, and agreed to contribute two guest posts about the transition from a postdoc to running … Continue reading

Posted in career | 4 Comments