Category Archives: book review

Don’t trust your data: reviewing Bioinformatics Data Skills

There is little debate on the importance of bioinformatics for the present and future of science. As molecular ecologists, we are likely more aware of this than most disciplines due to the data explosion that has accompanied the wide application of … Continue reading

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Posted in bioinformatics, book review, genomics, software | Tagged | 2 Comments

Bigger on the inside

Evolutionary biology is, fundamentally, the study of how populations of living things change over time. Different creatures live different lives, and at any given point in time they seem to do so relatively well, which poses a question: how do … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, book review, evolution, genomics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

How A Troublesome Inheritance gets human genetics wrong

Probably since before the origin of modern Homo sapiens, we have known that people from other places—the next village over, the other side of the mountains, or some distant and unexplored land—were different from us. Some of those differences were … Continue reading

Posted in book review, genomics, population genetics | Tagged , , | 13 Comments

Sequencer to the stars

No single person is responsible for the revolution in genetic data collection that has reshaped biology over just a handful of decades, but if you had to make a list of people deserving credit, Craig Venter’s name would be among … Continue reading

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Relentless Evolution: The vital relevance of the visible

One of Stephen Jay Gould’s sharpest conceptual coinages was a barb leveled, from his paleontological perspective, at the body of research focused on bouts of adaptive evolution occurring over “ecological” timespans on the order of a few generations. Reviewing such … Continue reading

Posted in book review, population genetics, quantitative genetics, speciation | Tagged , , | 5 Comments