Category Archives: association genetics

Still ruffling feathers after all these years: Darwin’s finches and a molecular view of adaptive radiation

One of the many lovely things about molecular ecology is its ability to shine new light on old stories. The well-known case of Darwin’s finches is a classic example of adaptive radiation. These finches demonstrate a clear instance where over time, … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, evolution, genomics, Molecular Ecology, the journal, population genetics, RNAseq, selection, speciation | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Conifer convergence

Convergent local adaptation is typically studied within a species or between closely related species. In these cases, it is perhaps not unexpected to observe parallel evolution due to common genetic variation, constraints, etc. Convergence between species is somewhat less studied, … Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, association genetics, genomics, plants, selection, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

STITCH, in time, could save a lot of array design

A new algorithm for processing DNA sequence data, STITCH, could lower costs for studies of genetic variation within species by reconstructing, or “imputing”, the sequences of individual samples within a larger dataset. The ongoing proliferation of high-throughput (or, ugh, “next … Continue reading

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New insight into the genetic basis of industrial melanism

The evolution of coloration in peppered moths during the industrial revolution is one of the most well known examples of natural selection in action. Part of the appeal of the system is the apparent simplicity. The once-abundant light colored morph … Continue reading

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Steelhead in a random forest: identifying the genetic basis of migration

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been quite successful in identifying variants associated with various phenotypes (I suppose there is some debate surrounding this statement. For an interesting, if dated, discussion look here). While most of this work was originally conducted … Continue reading

Posted in association genetics, bioinformatics, conservation, genomics, next generation sequencing | Leave a comment

Searching for heroic MHC genes in the fight against fungal takeover

Frogs have been disappearing all around the world in the past few decades. The reasons for these declines have been complex, but one of the biggest players is a nasty disease with an even nastier-sounding name: chytridiomycosis. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the … Continue reading

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Veritas Genetics offers $999 (human) genome sequences

Veritas Genetics, a company co-founded by Harvard University geneticist George Church* announced today that it will sequence your genome for less than $1,000. One dollar less, specifically. Up to now, “personal genome” services like 23andMe have used methods that don’t … Continue reading

Posted in association genetics, bioinformatics, genomics, medicine, next generation sequencing | Tagged , , | 2 Comments