Author Archives: Jeremy Yoder

About Jeremy Yoder

Jeremy Yoder is an Assistant Professor of Biology at California State University, Northridge. He also blogs at Denim and Tweed, and tweets under the handle @jbyoder.

Friday action item: Figure out how to support a grad student without DACA

On Fridays while the current administration is in office we’re posting small, concrete things you can do to help make things better. Got a suggestion for an Action Item? E-mail us! We haven’t done an Action Item in a while, … Continue reading

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Posted in community, politics, United States | Tagged , | Leave a comment

In the aftermath of fire, bluebird species boundaries may blur

One of the most clear-cut reasons that species evolve to fill different ecological niches is competition. Two otherwise similar species that use the same resources experience strong selection favoring the use of less-similar resources, if they have the option. The … Continue reading

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Posted in birds, evolution, hybridization, natural history, population genetics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The genomic architecture of ecological speciation

Speciation reshapes the ways genetic diversity is distributed in the genome — it’s been said that the establishment of reproductive isolation is essentially the evolution of genome-wide linkage disequilibrium. The “genomic islands of speciation” model of ecological isolation imagines genome-wide … Continue reading

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Posted in association genetics, linkage mapping, selection, speciation | Tagged | Leave a comment

TME Chat: That #NewPI life

This post is a new format for The Molecular Ecologist: a group chat. Sometimes there are multiple TME contributors who have interesting takes on the same topic, and it’d be nice to hear from them all, and sometimes a conversation … Continue reading

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This new review explains why soft sweeps are the bane — and the baseline — of ecological genetics

If you’ve done ecological genetics research in the last decade, you’ve almost certainly cited a series of papers by Pleuni Pennings and Joachim Hermisson, which broke down the problem of soft selective sweeps. Pennings and Hermisson have revisited soft sweeps … Continue reading

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Posted in adaptation, evolution, genomics | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

No, I don’t write for the Genetic Literacy Project (and I never will)

So yesterday I got a notification on Twitter that the Genetic Literacy Project had posted about my pushback on an account of scientific racism published by NPR. Well, nifty, I guess. I’d encountered the GLP before — it’s a news … Continue reading

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Posted in blogging | 3 Comments