How Molecular Ecologists Work: it’s back and we need your help

Molecular Ecologist contributors are hard at work behind the scenes filling out a busy fall of new posts. Part of the renewed push includes a new season of “How Molecular Ecologists Work”, a chance to sit down at the desks of our colleagues and see their approaches on productivity. Along the way, we picked up on a few dozen helpful tips, saw offices that varied from coffee shops to beautiful views, and learned that no one actually believes they are all that productive.

The response to last year’s interviews were fantastic, and it was clear that the readers of this blog have an intense curiosity for the details that make up our daily work, whether it be in the lab, out in the field, or at a computer terminal. However, it was clear that How Molecular Ecologists Work was biased towards the United States. This might not be surprising since most of us contributors are based at US universities (spatial autocorrelation?), but we can do better profiling molecular ecologists from across the world.

This is where you come in. Take a look at series 1 of How Molecular Ecologists Work, then ask yourself: Do I admire an international scientist and want to know more about how they work? If you do, contact me (robert.d.denton@gmail.com)!

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About Rob Denton

I’m a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at UConn. I’m most interested in understanding the evolutionary/ecological consequences of strange reproduction in salamanders (unisexual Ambystoma). Topics I’m likely to write about: population and landscape genetics, mitonuclear interactions, polyploidy, and reptiles/amphibians.

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